Icacinaceae fossil provides evidence for a Cretaceous origin of lamiids

  • Magallón, S., Gómez-Acevedo, S., Sánchez-Reyes, LL & Hernández-Hernández, T. A metacalibrated time tree documents the early rise in phylogenetic diversity in flowering plants. N. Phytol. 207437–453 (2015).

    Google Scholar article

  • Atkinson, BA, Stockey, RA & Rothwell, GW Tracing the initial diversification of asterids: anatomically preserved cornalean fruits from the early Coniacian (Upper Cretaceous) of western North America. Int. J. Factory Sci. 17921–35 (2018).

    Google Scholar article

  • Manchester, SR, Grímsson, F. & Zetter, R. Assessing the asterid fossil record in the context of our current phylogenetic framework. Anna. Mo. Botanical Gard. 100329–363 (2015).

    Google Scholar article

  • Martinez, C. et al. Rariglanda jerseyensisa new erical fossil flower from the Upper Cretaceous of New Jersey. Botanical 94747–758 (2016).

    Google Scholar article

  • Stull, GW, Soltis, PS, Soltis, DE, Gitzendanner, MA & Smith, SA Nuclear phylogenomic analyzes of asteroids conflict with plastome trees and support novel relationships between major lineages. A m. J.Bot. 107790–805 (2020).

    PubMed Google Scholar article

  • Zhang, C. et al. Phylogenomics/phylotranscriptomics of asterids reveals morphological evolutionary histories and supports phylogenetic placement for many whole-genome duplications. Mol. Biol. Evolution 373188–3210 (2020).

    CAS Google Scholar Article

  • Magallón, S., Crane, PR & Herendeen, PS Phylogenetic model, diversity and diversification of eudicots. Anne. Mo. Botanical Gard. 86297–372 (1999).

    Google Scholar article

  • Angiosperm phylogeny group. An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for orders and families of flowering plants: APG IV. Bot. J. Linn. Soc. 1811–20 (2016).

  • Manchester, SR & O’Leary, EL Phylogenetic distribution and identification of fin-winged fruits. Bot. Round. 761–82 (2010).

    Google Scholar article

  • Hilton, R. & Antuzzi, P. Chico Formation provides clues to the Upper Cretaceous paleoenvironment in California. California geol. 544–10 (1997).

    Google Scholar

  • Ward, PD, Haggart, JW, Mitchell, R., Kirschvink, JL & Tobin, T. Integrating Macrofossil Biostratigraphy and Magnetostratigraphy for the Upper Cretaceous of the Pacific Coast (Campanian-Maastrichtian) of North America and implications for the correlation with the western interior and Tethys. Geol. Soc. A m. Bull. 124957–974 (2012).

    CAS Google Scholar Article

  • Verosub, KL, Haggart, JW & Ward, PD Magnetostratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous strata of the Sacramento Valley, California. Geol. Soc. A m. Bull. 101521-533 (1989).

    Google Scholar article

  • Parham, JF & Stidham, TA Late Cretaceous sea turtles from the Chico Formation of California. PaleoBios 191–7 (1999).

    Google Scholar

  • Stull, GW, Duno de Stefano, R., Soltis, DE & Soltis, PS Solving basal lamiid phylogeny and circumscription of Icacinaceae with a plastome-scale dataset. A m. J.Bot. 1021794-1813 (2015).

    CAS PubMed Google Scholar Article

  • Miers, J. Observations on the affinities of the Olacaceae. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. 8161-184 (1851).

    Google Scholar article

  • Reid, EM & Chandler, MEJ The London Clay Flora (Oxford Univ. Press, 1933).

  • Stull, GW, Herrera, F., Manchester, SR, Jaramillo, C. & Tiffney, BH Fruits of an “Old World” tribe (Phytocreneae; Icacinaceae) from the Paleogene of North and South America. System Bot. 37784–794 (2012).

  • Rankin, BD, Stockey, RA, and Beard, G. Fruits of Icacinaceae from the Eocene Appian Way locality of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Int. J. Factory Sci. 169305–314 (2008).

    Google Scholar article

  • Rio, CD, Thomas, R. & Franceschi, DD Fruits of Icacinaceae Miers from the Paleocene of the Paris Basin (Oise, France). Land Approx. Science. Trans. R. Soc. Edinb. 108459–469 (2017).

  • Stull, GW, Adams, NF, Manchester, SR, Sykes, D. & Collinson, ME Revision of the Early Eocene London Clay Flora Icacinaceae based on X-ray micro-CT. Botanical 94713–745 (2016).

    CAS Google Scholar Article

  • Scott, RA and Barghoorn, ES Phytocrene Microcarp – a new species of Icacinaceae based on Cretaceous fruits from Kreischerville, New York. J. Paleosciences 625–28 (1957).

    Google Scholar article

  • Knobloch, E. & Mai, DH Monographie der früchte und samen in der Kreide von Mitteleuropa. Rozpravy ústredího ústavu geologickenho Praha 471–219 (1986).

    Google Scholar

  • Soudry, D. & Gregor, H.-J. israeli jodes sp. Nov.: A huge icacinaceous phosphate-mineralized fruiting body from the Upper Cretaceous of the Negev, southern Israel. Cretac. Res. 18161-178 (1997).

    Google Scholar article

  • Stull, GW, Moore, BR & Manchester, SR Icacinaceae fruits from the Eocene of southeastern North America and their biogeographical implications. Int. J. Factory Sci. 172935–947 (2011).

    Google Scholar article

  • Del Rio, C. & De Franceschi, D. Icacinaceae fossil record and its paleogeographic implications. Reverend Palaeobot. Palynol. 273104135 (2020).

    Google Scholar article

  • Tang, KK, Smith, SY & Atkinson, BA Extending beyond Gondwana: Cunoniaceae from the Cretaceous of western North America. N. Phytol. 234704–718 (2022).

    Google Scholar article

  • Atkinson, BA, Stockey, RA & Rothwell, GW Cretaceous origin of dogwoods: an anatomically preserved origin Horned (Cornaceae) fruit from the Campanian of Vancouver Island. PeerJ 4e2808 (2016).

    PubMed Article PubMed Central Google Scholar

  • Atkinson, BA Fossil evidence of a Cretaceous rise of the mahogany family. A m. J.Bot. 107139-147 (2020).

    PubMed Google Scholar article

  • Matsunaga, KKS & Smith, SY Reading fossil palms: using fruits to reveal the deep roots of palm diversity. A m. J.Bot. 108472–494 (2021).

    CAS PubMed Article PubMed Central Google Scholar

  • Atkinson, BA The critical role of fossils in inferring deep knot phylogenetic relationships and macroevolutionary patterns in Cornales. A m. J.Bot. 1051401-1411 (2018).

    PubMed Google Scholar article

  • Srivastava, R., Wheeler, EA, Manchester, SR & Baas, P. Oleaceae wood from the late Cretaceous of India – the earliest olive branch. IAWA J. 36443–451 (2015).

    Google Scholar article

  • Burnham, R. An overview of the fossil record of climbers: bejucos, sogas, trepadoras, lianas, cipós, and vines. Rev. Brasileira De. Paleontology 12149-160 (2009).

    Google Scholar article

  • Smith, SY, Little, SA, Cooper, RL, Burnham, RJ & Stockey, RA A buttercup vine is from the Cretaceous of British Columbia, Canada: Atli morinii gen. and sp. nov. Int. J. Factory Sci. 174818–831 (2013).

    Google Scholar article

  • Back To Top